Skip to main content

Publication, Part of

Statistics on Smoking - England , 2018 [PAS]

Official statistics, National statistics

National Statistics

Part 1: Smoking-related ill health and mortality

This part presents information on the number of hospital admissions and the number of deaths that are attributable to smoking.

- Hospital admissions data is taken from the latest available Hospital Episode Statistics (HES). The latest available data covers 2016/17.

- Mortality data is taken from the Office for National Statistics (ONS) annual extract of registered deaths. The latest available data covers 2016. 

- Self reported health by smoking status is taken from the ONS Annual Population Survey 2017.

The estimates of the proportion of hospital admissions and deaths attributable to smoking are calculated following a recognised methodology.  This uses the proportions of current and ex-smokers in the population and the relative risks of these people dying from specific diseases or developing certain non-fatal conditions compared with those who have never smoked. See Appendix B for further details.  Figures presented relate to people aged 35 and over, as relative risks are only available for this age group.

Local Authority level data is taken from the Public Health England (PHE) Local Tobacco Control Profiles.

 

Hospital admissions estimated to be attributable to smoking, by year1,2

In 2016/17 there were estimated to be 484,700 hospital admissions attributable to smoking.

This is up from 474,300 in 2015/16 (an increase of 2%), and from 444,700 in 2006/07 (an increase of 9%).

 

In 2016/17 this represented 4% of all hospital admissions (down from 5% in 2006/07), and 27% of hospital admissions for conditions that can be caused by smoking (down from 31% in 2006/07).

 

Hospital admissions estimated to be attributable to smoking, by cause1,2

22% of all admissions for respiratory diseases, 15% of all admissions for circulatory diseases, and 9% of all admissions for cancers, were estimated to be attributable to smoking.

 

47% of admissions for cancers that can be caused by smoking, and 40% of admissions for respiratory diseases that can be caused by smoking, were estimated to be attributable to smoking.

 

Hospital admissions estimated to be attributable to smoking, by gender 1,2

 

Hospital admissions estimated to be attributable to smoking by Local Authority - rate per 100,000 population3

Blackpool, Manchester, Kingston upon Hull, Sunderland and Hartlepool had the highest smoking attributable admission rates; all above 3,000 per 100,000 population.

Wokingham had the lowest rate; 969 per 100,000 population. This was followed by Windsor and Maidenhead (1051), Isle of Wight (1082), and Redbridge (1091).

 

Self reported health by smoking status

Adults (aged 18+) who have never smoked were more likely to report better health than current4 or ex-smokers.

42% of those who had never smoked reported being in very good health, compared to 26% of current smokers.

Conversely, 11% of current smokers, reported being in bad or very bad health, compared to 5% of those who had never smoked.

________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

1.  For adults aged 35 and over with admission condition based on primary diagnosis.

2.  Estimates based on smoking prevalence and risks of smokers/ex-smokers developing each disease – see Appendix B: Technical Notes, Section 1 for details.

3.  Directly standardised rate of estimated smoking attributable admissions in people aged 35+.

4. Anyone who answered yes to the question ‘do you smoke cigarettes at all nowadays?’ was recorded as a current smoker.

For more information on the data in this section: 

 

 

Deaths estimated to be attributable to smoking, by year1,2

In 2016 there were estimated to be 77,900 deaths attributable to smoking.

This is down from 79,100 in 2015 (a decrease of 2%), and from 83,400 in 2006 (a decrease of 7%).

 

This represents 16% of all deaths (down from 18% in 2006), and 33% of deaths for conditions that can be caused by smoking (up from 31% in 2006).

 

Deaths estimated to be attributable to smoking, by cause1,2

37% of all deaths for respiratory diseases, and 26% of all deaths for cancers, were estimated to be attributable to smoking.

 

54% of deaths for cancers that can be caused by smoking, 48% of deaths for respiratory diseases that can be caused by smoking, and 45% of deaths for diseases of the digestive system that can be caused by smoking, were estimated to be attributable to smoking.

 

Deaths estimated to be attributable to smoking, by gender 1,2

 

Deaths estimated to be attributable to smoking by Local Authority - rate per 100,000 population3, 2014 - 2016

Manchester had the highest rate with 499 per 100,000 population, followed by Kingston upon Hull (470) and Knowsley (464).

The lowest rates were in Harrow (162), Wokingham (181), and Rutland (184).

________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

1.  Registered deaths amongst adults aged 35 and over based on original cause of death.

2.  Estimates based on smoking prevalence and risks of smokers/ex-smokers developing each disease – see Appendix B: Technical Notes, Section 1 for details.

3.  Directly standardised rate of estimated smoking attributable deaths in people aged 35+.


Last edited: 10 July 2018 9:32 am