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Publication

Statistics on Women's Smoking Status at Time of Delivery - England, Quarter 2, 2012-13

This is part of

Official statistics
Publication date:
Geographic coverage:
England
Geographical granularity:
Strategic Health Authorities, Primary Care Organisations, Primary Care Trusts
Date range:
01 Jul 2012 to 30 Sep 2012

Summary

Note 16/01/2012:

 

It has been identified that some of the data in the publication 'Statistics on Women's Smoking Status at Time of Delivery - England, Quarter 2, 2012-13' have been reported incorrectly. This only affects the figures reported for financial year 2011/12. Primary Care Trusts (PCTs) submit data quarterly and at each quarter they can amend historic figures. The figures published for the financial year 2011/12 for some PCTs and for England were the sum of the quarterly data submitted rather than revised annual figures received later. Please see the errata note for further information. We apologise for any inconvenience this may have caused.

 

Summary:

 

This report presents the latest results and trends from the women's smoking status at time of delivery (SATOD) data collection in England.  It includes new figures for the second quarter of 2012/13.

 

The results provide a measure of the prevalence of smoking among pregnant women at Strategic Health Authority (SHA) and Primary Care Trust (PCT) levels.  This supplements the national information available from the quinquennial Infant Feeding Survey (IFS).

 

Babies from deprived backgrounds are more likely to be born to mothers who smoke, and to have much greater exposure to secondhand smoke in childhood.  Smoking remains one of the few modifiable risk factors in pregnancy.  It can cause a range of serious health problems, including lower birth weight, pre-term birth, placental complications and perinatal mortality.

 

Reports in the series prior to 2011/12 quarter 3 are available from the Department of Health website (external)

Key facts

 In England in 2012/13 Q2:

  • The percentage of mothers smoking at delivery was 12.7 per cent, lower than the 2011/12 outturn (13.2 per cent), 2010/11 outturn (13.5 per cent) and 2009/10 outturn (14.0 per cent) (Table 1).
  • Amongst all Strategic Health Authorities (SHAs), this varied from 18.9 per cent in the North East SHA to 5.6 per cent in London SHA (Table 5).
  • Amongst the 146 Primary Care Trusts (PCTs) that passed validation, smoking prevalence at delivery ranged from 30.1 per cent in Blackpool PCT to 2.0 per cent in Richmond and Twickenham PCT (Table 5).

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Last edited: 11 April 2018 5:23 pm