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Publication, Part of

Statistics on NHS Stop Smoking Services - England, April 2010 to June 2010, Q1, Quarterly report

Official statistics
Publication Date:
Geographic Coverage:
England
Geographical Granularity:
Strategic Health Authorities, Primary Care Organisations
Date Range:
01 Apr 2010 to 30 Jun 2010

Summary

This quarterly report presents provisional results from the monitoring of the NHS Stop Smoking Services (NHS SSS) in England during the period 1 April 2010 to 30 June 2010. This report includes information on the number of people setting a quit date and the number who successfully quit at the 4 week follow-up. It also presents in depth analyses of the key measures of the service including pregnant women, breakdowns by ethnic groups and type of pharmacotherapy received and regional analyses at Strategic Health Authority (SHA) and Primary Care Trust (PCT) levels.

Quarterly results from the monitoring of NHS SSS for 2010/11 are provisional and will subsequently be revised to account for any revisions submitted by PCTs throughout the year. At this stage, any comparisons between 2010/11 and earlier years compare provisional figures with final figures. Final figures for 2010/11 will be included in the end of year report, expected to be published in August 2011.

Key Facts

  • 166,556 people set a quit date through NHS Stop Smoking Services, a decrease of 10 per cent (19,296) on the final figure for same period in 2009/10 (185,852), and an increase of 11 per cent (17,161) on the final figure for the same period in 2008/09 (149,395).
  • At the 4 week follow-up 78,250 people had successfully quit (based on self-report), 47 per cent of those setting a quit date. This is a decrease of 12 per cent (11,108) on the final figure for the same period in 2009/10 (89,358), but an increase of 7 per cent (4,889) on the final figure for the same period in 2008/09 (73,361).
  • 71 per cent of successful quitters at the 4 week follow-up had their results confirmed by Carbon Monoxide (CO) verification (CO verification measures the level of carbon monoxide in the bloodstream and provides an indication of the level of use of tobacco). This percentage was 68 per cent based on final figures for the same period in 2009/10 and 67 per cent based on final figures for the same period in 2008/09.
  • Of those setting a quit date, success at the four week follow-up increased with age, from 32 per cent of those aged under 18, to 55 per cent of those aged 60 and over.
  • Of the 4,899 pregnant women who set a quit date, 2,102 successfully quit at the four week follow-up (43 per cent).
  • The majority of those setting a quit date received Nicotine Replacement Therapy (NRT) only (62 per cent). A further 26 per cent received varenicline (Champix) only, 1 per cent received bupropion (Zyban) only, 1 per cent received both NRT and varenicline and less than 1 per cent received both NRT and bupropion. 6 per cent of people setting a quit date did not receive any pharmacotherapy and the type of treatment was unknown for a further 3 per cent.
  • Of those who used varenicline 59 per cent successfully quit, compared with 50 per cent who received bupropion only, and 44 per cent who received NRT only. 44 per cent of people who did not receive any type of pharmacotherapy successfully quit. (These data should not be used to assess or compare the clinical effectiveness of the various pharmacotherapies as they reflect only the results obtained through the NHS stop smoking services, and are not based on clinical trials. A trained stop smoking advisor discusses and agrees the treatment option with each client.)
  • Total expenditure on NHS Stop Smoking Services was £21.4 million, an increase of 5 per cent (£1.0 million) on the final figure for the same period in 2009/10 (£20.3 million) and an increase of 36 per cent (£5.6 million) on the final figure for the same period in 2008/09 (£15.7 million). The cost per quitter is £273 compared with £227 based on final figures for the same period in 2009/10 and £215 based on final figures for the same period in 2008/09. These figures do not include expenditure on pharmacotherapies.
  • Among Strategic Health Authorities (SHAs), the South West SHA reported the highest proportion of successful quitters (53 per cent), while West Midlands SHA reported the lowest success rate (42 per cent).
  • Among Primary Care Trusts (PCTs), Leeds PCT reported the highest proportion of successful quitters (67 per cent), while Camden PCT reported the lowest success rate (24 per cent).
  • For Quarter 1 in 2009/10, the increase between the provisional figures and the final figures was 13.4 per cent for the number setting a quit date and 12.6 per cent for the number of successful quitters (based on self-report). This suggests that the final figures for 2010/11 may be higher than the provisional figures stated above.
  • For Quarter 1 in 2009/10, there was a decrease of 0.6 per cent between the provisional and final Quarter 1 expenditure figure.

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Last edited: 21 May 2019 10:40 am