Publication

Retrospective Review of Surgery for Urogynaecological Prolapse and Stress Urinary Incontinence using Tape or Mesh: Hospital Episode Statistics (HES), Experimental Statistics, April 2008 - March 2017 [PAS]

Experimental statistics
Publication Date:
Geographic Coverage:
England
Geographical Granularity:
Country
Date Range:
01 Apr 2008 to 31 Mar 2017

Page contents


Summary

This report has been produced by NHS Digital, to investigate activity, summarised within Hospital Episode Statistics (HES) data, for the NHS, in England, of patients who have had a urogynaecological procedure for the treatment of urogynaecological prolapse or stress urinary incontinence, including those where mesh, tape or their equivalents have been used.

The report has been undertaken to assist the NHS and others in establishing a clearer national picture of patients who have had such procedures. The HES data warehouse contains details of all admissions, outpatient appointments and accident and emergency (A&E) attendances at NHS hospitals in England. This report covers the period from April 2008 to March 2017, using Admitted Patient Care and Outpatient data.

These statistics are classified as experimental and should be used with caution. Experimental statistics are new official statistics undergoing evaluation. They are published in order to involve users and stakeholders in their development and as a means to build in quality at an early stage. More information about experimental statistics can be found on the UK Statistics Authority website.

Additional analyses published as "management information" has also been published alongside this report. This is analysis of additional procedure codes that have been used in previous analytical investigations into this subject area. Please note the index procedure codes used in this file have not been identified specifically by the Clinical Classification Service to identify urogynaecological procedures for the treatment of urogynaecological prolapse or stress urinary incontinence. Therefore these codes have not been used within experimental statistics analyses associated with the main official statistics report. The Clinical Classifications Service is the definitive source of clinical coding guidance and sets the national standards used by the NHS in coding clinical data.

Key Facts

•Between April 2008 and March 2017, 194,107 patients had urogynaecological procedures of which 96,286 were for urogynaecological prolapse and 101,538 were for stress urinary incontinence.

•The number of patients with reported urogynaecological procedures, to treat urogynaecological prolapse or stress urinary incontinence, has reduced year on year from; 25,416 patients in the period April 2008 to March 2009 to 17,349 patients in the period April 2016 to March 2017. A reduction of 32 percent.

•Between April 2008 to March 2017, 100,516 patients had a reported tape insertion procedure for stress urinary incontinence.

•In the period April 2016 to March 2017 there were 7,245 patients who had an insertion for this procedure group type, a reduction of 48 per cent from the period April 2008 to March 2009 when 13,990 patients were recorded.

•Between April 2008 to March 2017, 1,195 patients had a reported non-tape procedure for stress urinary incontinence.

•In the period April 2016 to March 2017 there were 133 patients who had a initial procedure for this procedure group type, a reduction of 6 per cent from April 2008 to March 2009 when 141 patients were recorded.

•Between April 2008 to March 2017, 27,016 patients had a reported mesh insertion procedure for urogynaecological prolapse.

•In the period April 2016 to March 2017 there were 2,680 patients who had an insertion for this procedure group type, a reduction of 13 per cent from April 2008 to March 2009 when 3,073 patients were recorded.

•Between April 2008 to March 2017, 71,350 patients had a reported a non-mesh procedure for urogynaecological prolapse.

•In the period April 2016 to March 2017 there were 7,334 patients who had this procedure group type, a reduction of 12 per cent from April 2008 to March 2009 when 8,338 patients were recorded.

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