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New statistical reports relating to adult social care published today
The latest statistics on adult social care — covering outcomes, activity, finance and the opinions of those receiving care — have been published by NHS Digital today.

The latest statistics on adult social care — covering outcomes, activity, finance and the opinions of those receiving care — have been published by NHS Digital today.

The new reports relate to England and most contain figures covering 2019-20. An additional one-off mid-year publication covers April to September 2020 and includes selected statistics on adult social care.

  • Personal Social Services Adult Social Care Survey, England 2019-20

This annual survey1, conducted by councils with Adult Social Services Responsibilities (CASSRs) provides estimates for all service users based on a survey sample. In 2019-20, responses from a sample of 62,520 people were used to provide estimates for an overall population of 608,1452 service users.

The survey found that 64.2%3 (389,130) of service users were very or extremely satisfied with the care and support they received. This is a very similar proportion to last year (64.3%)4.

The percentage of service users who were very or extremely dissatisfied with the care and support they received also remained stable at 2.1% (12,430) compared with 2.0% in 2018-194.

There was a significant increase in the percentage of service users that reported having no pain ‒ 37.2% (225,650) reported they had no pain or discomfort on the day that they completed the survey, compared to 36.6% in 2018-19.

The percentage of service users aged over 85 has decreased over each of the last 5 years. The percentage decreased from 27.3% in 2018-19 to 26.8% (162,230) in 2019-20.

The proportion of service users that have practical help on a regular basis from either a partner, family member, friend or neighbour increased from 40.8% in 2018-19 to 42.3% (256,220) in 2019-20.

This year’s survey found that 45.9% (278,280) of service users reported they had as much social contact as they wanted with people they like, while 6.3% (38,320) reported they had little social contact and felt socially isolated. Last year 45.9% had as much social contact as they liked and 5.9% felt socially isolated5.

  • Measures from the Adult Social Care Outcomes Framework 2019-20

This publication draws on a number of data collections6 and measures how well care and support services achieve the outcomes that matter most to people.

Several measures showed a significant change since the previous year, including delayed transfers of care7 from hospital which were attributed to adult social care8. These increased from 10.3 per 100,000 population9 in 2018-19 to 10.8 per 100,000 population in 2019-20.

The proportion of young adults whose long-term support needs were met by admission to residential and nursing care homes increased from 13.9 per 100,000 population the previous year to 14.6 per 100,000 population in 2019-20.

The publication includes statistics on the proportion of adults in contact with secondary mental health services who are also in paid employment. Nationally, this is 9.0% in paid employment, with the Eastern region having the highest proportion (17.0%) and the North West region having the lowest proportion (5.0%).

  •  Adult Social Care Activity and Finance report 2019-2010

In 2019-20, local authorities received 1.9 million requests11 from 1.4 million new clients, which is equivalent to 5,290 requests for support received per day by local authorities.

Local authority spending was £19.7 billion in 2019-20. This represents an increase of £918 million from the previous year, a 4.9% increase in cash terms and a 2.4% increase in real terms.

The area of care which saw the largest increase in expenditure was long term support, which increased by £748 million to £15.4 billion in 2019-20, an increase in cash terms of 5.1%.

Overall, the number of clients receiving long term care has decreased each year since 2015-16, to 838,530 in 2019-20. This has been mainly driven by a decrease in clients aged 65 and over receiving long term care, down 39,045 to 548,450 since 2015-16.

The average cost of residential care for a person aged 65 and over rose from £636 per week in 2018-19 to £662 per week in 2019-20, while the average cost of nursing care for the same age band increased from £678 per week in 2018-19 to £715 per week in 2019-20.

  • Mid-Year Adult Social Care Activity Data Collection

This is a one-off Management Information12 publication including selected statistics from various adult social care publications for the first two quarters of 2020-21. This is to help give an early view of how adult social care has been affected by coronavirus (COVID-19). However, submitting data for this report was not mandatory, so it will not provide a full picture of the situation across all local authorities13.

ENDS

Read the full reports

Personal Social Services Adult Social Care Survey, England 2019-20

Measures from the Adult Social Care Outcomes Framework 2019-20

Adult Social Care Activity and Finance report 2019-20

Mid-Year Adult Social Care Activity Data Collection

 

Notes for editors

    1. The survey, which is in its tenth year, seeks the opinions of service users aged 18 and over, who are in receipt of long-term support services, which are funded or managed by social services.
    2. In 2018-19 151 CASSRs took part, compared to 2019-20 when 147 CASSRs took part. This report uses data collected from a sample of 62,520 service users who participated in the 2019-20 survey and these are weighted to make inferences (or estimates) about the questionnaire responses for the whole eligible population (608,145 service users).
    3. Percentages are rounded to one decimal place; the percentages given for each question may therefore not add up to 100 per cent. The proportions have been calculated by weighting the response data using eligible population figures, to estimate the proportion of the population who hold these views. As these questionnaire responses are estimates the figures quoted in relation to the number of ‘service users’ or ‘people’ are rounded to the nearest 10. The known figures, such as the eligible population, are rounded to the nearest five.
    4. This change is not statistically significant.
    5. Although this is lower than the 6.3% in 2018-19, the change is not statistically significant.
    6. The report includes data from the Adult Social Care Survey, Short and Long Term Support (SALT), Delayed Transfers of Care and the Mental Health Services dataset.
    7. A delayed transfer of care (DToC) occurs when a patient is ready to depart from such care and is still occupying a bed. A patient is ready for transfer when:

    a. A clinical decision has been made that patient is ready for transfer AND

    b. A multi-disciplinary team decision has been made that patient is ready for transfer

    AND

    c. The patient is safe to discharge/transfer.

    1. Delayed transfers can be attributable to the NHS, social care or both. ASCOF measure 2C is in three parts to cover all three options.
    2. The denominator is for the population of the area who are aged 18 and over. The delayed transfers are an average number of delays (for those aged 18 and over) each day, which is calculated by dividing the number of delayed days during the month by the number of calendar days in the month. An average is then calculated across a 12-month reporting period.
    3. The Adult Social Care Activity and Finance Report 2019-20 contains aggregate information submitted by 151 Councils with Adult Social Services Responsibilities (CASSRs) in England, to provide insight into adult social care activity and expenditure for the period 1 April 2019 to 31 March 2020. This is the fourth year in which the adult social care activity and finance data have been brought together in an official statistics report. Activity data is sourced from the Short and Long Term (SALT) return. Adult social care activity provided or arranged by local authorities covers a wide range of services including long term and short-term care, plus support to carers. As such, it does not cover adult social care activity that is provided or funded elsewhere, for example, if the care is arranged and funded by the client without any involvement from the local authority. Finance data is taken from the Adult Social Care Finance Return (ASC-FR).
    4. The requests reported here are those for which an outcome was determined in the year.
    5. Management information describes aggregate information collated and used in the normal course of business to inform operational delivery, policy development or the management of organisational performance. It is usually based on administrative data but can also be a product of survey data. Administrative data refers to information collected primarily for administrative reasons (i.e.not primarily for statistics or research).
    6. Submissions were received for the Mid-Year Adult Social Care Activity Data Collection from 82% of CASSRs, with varying degrees of completeness in their returns.

     


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Last edited: 7 September 2021 11:15 am