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Publication, Part of

Provisional Monthly Hospital Episode Statistics for Admitted Patient Care, Outpatients and Accident and Emergency Data - April 2012 to May 2012

Official statistics
Publication Date:
Geographic Coverage:
England
Geographical Granularity:
Country
Date Range:
01 Apr 2012 to 31 May 2012

Summary

Hospital Episodes Statistics (HES) is a data warehouse containing records of all patients admitted to NHS hospitals in England. It contains details of inpatient care, outpatient appointments and A&E attendance records. The Kennedy report recommended that HES should be "supported as a major national resource for the monitoring of a range of healthcare outcomes".

Hospital episode statistics (HES) statistics are produced and published on a monthly basis. This data is provisional and should therefore be treated as an estimate until the final National Statistics annual publications.

Key Facts

Monthly HES data for Inpatients

 

In the year from June 2011 to May 2012 there were:

  • 17.6 million finished consultant episodes (FCEs), 59.8 per cent (10.5 million) of which included at least one procedure or intervention, and 6.0 million of which were day cases.

  • 15.1 million finished admission episodes (FAEs), of which 5.3 million were emergency admissions.

Monthly HES for Outpatients

 

In the year from June 2011 to May 2012 there were:

  • 92.3 million outpatient appointments made, with 73.8 million (79.9 per cent) of these attended by the patient.

  • 6.8 million outpatient appointments not attended by the patient, representing 7.4 per cent of all appointments.

Provisional Monthly HES data for Accident and Emergency (Experimental Data)

 

In the year from June 2011 to May 2012 there were:

  • 17.7 million A&E attendances recorded in A&E HES. Of these 3.7 million (20.8 per cent) resulted in admission to hospital for inpatient treatment, 3.5 million (19.8 per cent) resulted in a GP follow up, and 6.8 million (38.8%) were discharged with no follow up.

HES monthly topic of interest: Anxiety and Stress

 

Key Facts

Provisional data on the admission of inpatients to hospital in the period June 2011 to May 2012 shows that:

Anxiety

  • There were 8,586 Finished Admission Episodes (FAEs) due to anxiety. This represented a 2.6 per cent decrease on the previous 12-month period when there were 8,811 FAEs. Overall admissions increased 1.9 per cent over the same period.

  • 62.8 per cent of FAEs due to anxiety were for females.

  • The North East Strategic Health Authority had the highest rate of FAEs for anxiety (23.9 per 100,000 of the population). The next highest rate occurred in the North West Strategic Health Authority (23.4 per 100,000). The South Central and South West Strategic Health Authorities had the lowest rates of admissions due to anxiety (10.6 per 100,000 and 12.5 per 100,000 respectively).

  • For both genders the rate of admission due to anxiety increases with age. The rate of admissions for females is higher across most ages and increases markedly after the age of sixty.

  • The average length of stay in hospital following admission for anxiety is highest for those aged 60 to 79.

Stress

  • There were 6,366 FAEs due to stress. This represented a 6.8 per cent increase on the previous 12-month period when there were 5,959 FAEs.

  • 54.1 per cent of FAEs due to stress were for males.

  • The North West Strategic Health Authority had the highest rate of FAEs for stress (20.0 per 100,000 of the population). The next highest rate occurred in the London Strategic Health Authority (15.9 per 100,000). The South West and South Central Strategic Health Authorities had the lowest rates of admissions due to stress (6.7 per 100,000 of the population and 7.1 per 100,000 of the population respectively).

  • The rate of admission due to stress is similar for both genders. In both cases the rate of admission prior to the teenage years is negligible but then increases and remains approximately constant until the early fifties when it falls into decline.

  • The average length of stay in hospital following admission for stress is highest for young females (10-19) and elderly males (70+).

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Last edited: 11 April 2018 5:07 pm