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Publication, Part of

Provisional Monthly Hospital Episode Statistics for Admitted Patient Care, Outpatients and Accident and Emergency Data - April 2011 to February 2012

Official statistics
Publication Date:
Geographic Coverage:
England
Geographical Granularity:
Country
Date Range:
01 Apr 2011 to 29 Feb 2012

Summary

Hospital Episodes Statistics (HES) is a data warehouse containing records of all patients admitted to NHS hospitals in England. It contains details of inpatient care, outpatient appointments and A&E attendance records. The Kennedy report recommended that HES should be "supported as a major national resource for the monitoring of a range of healthcare outcomes". Hospital episode statistics (HES) statistics are produced and published on a monthly basis. This data is provisional and should therefore be treated as an estimate until the final National Statistics annual publications.

Key Facts

HES data for Inpatients

In the year from March 2011 to February 2012 there were:

  • 17.4 million finished consultant episodes (FCEs), 59.5 per cent (10.4 million) of which included at least one procedure or intervention, and 5.9 million of which were day cases.
  • 15.0 million finished admission episodes (FAEs), of which 5.2 million were emergency admissions.

Monthly HES - Inpatient Clinical coding coverage

The shortfall between the most recent month's data is more pronounced when considering clinical (procedures and diagnoses) coverage. 6.1 per cent more procedures and 10.9 per cent more diagnoses were coded in the HES data submitted to SUS by 20/4/2012 (Month 12) - extract used for this publication, compared to the HES data submitted to SUS by 21/3/2012 (Month 11) used for 15th May 2012 publication.  We accordingly recommend extra caution using clinical codes for the most recent months data.
 
Monthly HES for Outpatients

In the year from March 2011 to February 2012 there were:

  • 90.8 million outpatient appointments made, with 72.6 million (79.9 per cent) of these attended by the patient.
  • 6.8 million outpatient appointments not attended by the patient, representing 7.5 per cent of all appointments.

Provisional Monthly HES data for Accident and Emergency (Experimental Data)

In the year from March 2011 to February 2012 there were:

17.2 million A&E attendances recorded in A&E HES. Of these 3.6 million (21.2 per cent) resulted in admission to hospital for inpatient treatment, 3.3 million (19.3 per cent) resulted in a GP follow up, and 6.7 million (38.8 per cent) were discharged with no follow up.

Provisional Monthly HES topic of interest: A&E Sports injury attendances

According to NHS Choices: Playing sport and doing regular exercise is good for your health, but sometimes you can injure yourself. Injuries can result from not warming up properly, using inadequate equipment, pushing yourself too hard or having an accident. Injuries will typically include bruises, sprains, strains, minor head injuries or tendonitis although in rarer cases injuries can include major head injuries, broken bones or ligament damage. Injuries can be classed as 'sudden' or 'overuse'. Overuse injuries result from repetitive actions and are often experienced by professional sports players (e.g. Tennis Elbow, Shin Splints) although children whose bodies are still growing are also vulnerable. Many minor injuries will heal themselves or will be self-treated (e.g. Using  pain killers or ice on a sprain). However, in other cases the injury may result in an attendance at A&E.
The Department of Health are the Official Source of A&E statistics through Quarterly Monitoring of Accident and Emergency (QMAE). Although A&E HES data is experimental and coverage remains incomplete it is able to provide detailed information about recorded A&E attendances.  However, caution should be taken when comparing years, as increases could reflect improvements in coverage, rather than actual increases in attendances.

Provisional data for the period March 2011 to February 2012 shows:

  • There were 388,515 unplanned A&E attendances recorded in HES for sports related injuries. This accounted for 2.3 per cent of all unplanned A&E attendances recorded (16,897,696).  This is an increase of 15 per cent on the corresponding period March 2010 to February 2011 (338,185). However, as a proportion of all unplanned A&E coverage over the same period this is an increase of 0.2 percentage points (from 2.1 per cent).
  • Over three quarters of all unplanned A&E attendances for sports injuries were for males (296,902; 76.4 per cent), compared to 23.5 per cent (91,246) for females. Over half (205,545; 52.9 per cent) of all unplanned A&E attendances for sports injuries were for males aged 10 to 29.
  • Over half (207,058; 53.3 per cent) of unplanned A&E attendances for sports injuries resulted in the patient being discharged with no further follow up, compared to 38.7 per cent of all unplanned A&E attendances. A further 12.8 per cent (49,633) were referred to a fracture clinic and 5.7 per cent (22,173) were admitted as inpatients (compared to 4.2 per cent and 21.5 per cent of all unplanned A&E attendances respectively).
  • Over half (210,311; 54.1 per cent) of unplanned A&E attendances for sports injuries resulted in an X-ray - this accounted for 4.5 per cent of all (unplanned) X-rays in A&E.
  • Of all unplanned A&E activity, sports injuries accounted for 12 per cent of crutch use; 9 per cent of splint treatment and 7 per cent of plaster of Paris treatment.
  • Attendances at A&E for sports injuries were lowest in December and the period June to August and were highest in March and the period September to October (this is also seen for the period March 2010 to February 2011).
  • Attendances at A&E for sports injuries were highest on Saturday afternoons (especially 3-5pm) and Sundays (especially 11-4pm). During the week the pattern of attendance showed a broadly similar trend to all A&E attendances except with greater proportions of attendances around 9AM (especially Mondays) and 4-8PM (except Fridays).
  • For those aged under 40 years, South West Strategic Health Authority saw the highest rate of A&E sports injury attendances (20.4 per 1000 population) and London Strategic Health Authority saw the lowest (6.8 per 1000 population).

 

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Last edited: 11 April 2018 5:06 pm