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Publication

Summary Hospital-level Mortality Indicator (SHMI) - Deaths associated with hospitalisation, England, April 2011 - March 2012, Experimental statistics

This is part of

Experimental statistics, Official statistics, Open data
Publication date:
Geographic coverage:
England
Geographical granularity:
NHS Trusts
Date range:
01 Apr 2011 to 31 Mar 2012

Summary

This publication of the SHMI relates to discharges in the reporting period April 2011 to March 2012.

Update (November 2012): Error in contextual indicator 'Deaths split by those occurring in hospital and those occurring outside hospital within 30 days of discharge'

A small error has been detected in the SHMI contextual indicator 'Deaths split by those occurring in hospital and those occurring outside hospital within 30 days of discharge'. An issue has been identified with the methodology we are using to identify deaths that occur in hospital and deaths that occur outside hospital within 30 days of discharge.

On the October 2012 release, this figure will be revised to approximately 74.1 per cent and 25.9 per cent respectively. Changes to previous quarters are similar. A revised methodology specification document will be published with the next release in January 2013.

This is the fifth publication of the Summary Hospital-level Mortality Indicator (SHMI). This publication introduces two additional contextual indicators: Provider spells split by deprivation quintile and Deaths split by deprivation quintile. Further details of this change can be found in the methodological changes document (see Related Links).

There are now 142 providers being reported on the SHMI compared to 143 for the previous publication. The consolidation of Scarborough and North East Yorkshire Healthcare NHS Trust (RCC) and York Teaching Hospital NHS Foundation Trust (RCB) will be treated as a merger for the purposes of the SHMI publication and therefore these providers will be reported under York Teaching Hospital NHS Foundation Trust (RCB) going forwards.

Note: York Teaching Hospital NHS Foundation Trust (RCB) have identified that 399 of their admitted patient care (APC) records have incomplete coverage for diagnosis fields. Caution is advised when interpreting the data for this trust. Further details can be found in the Month 13 HES data quality note (see Related Links).

Key facts

• 10 trusts had a SHMI value categorised as 'higher than expected'

• 16 trusts had a SHMI value categorised as 'lower than expected'

• 116 trusts had a SHMI value categorised as 'as expected'

• The percentage of patient admissions with palliative care coded at either diagnosis or specialty level is approximately 1.0%

• The percentage of patient deaths with palliative care coded at either diagnosis or specialty level is approximately 17.9%

• The percentage of elective admissions where a death occurs either in hospital or within thirty days (inclusive) of being discharged is approximately 0.7%

• The percentage of non-elective admissions including admissions coded as 'unknown' where a death occurs either in hospital or within thirty days (inclusive) of being discharged is approximately 3.7%

• The percentage of deaths split by those occurring in hospital and those occurring outside hospital within 30 days of discharge is approximately 75.7% and 24.3% respectively

• The percentage of finished provider spells falling under each deprivation quintile (where quintile 1 is the most deprived) is 23.1% for quintile 1, 19.9% for quintile 2, 17.8% for quintile 3, 16.2% for quintile 4 and 14.6% for quintile 5. There is insufficient information to calculate the deprivation quintile for 8.5% of finished provider spells.

• The percentage of deaths falling under each deprivation quintile (where quintile 1 is the most deprived) is 21.2% for quintile 1, 20.6% for quintile 2, 20.6 for quintile 3, 19.4% for quintile 4 and 16.8% for quintile 5. There is insufficient information to calculate the deprivation quintile for 1.4% of deaths

Resources

Related links

Last edited: 15 February 2018 2:41 pm