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Mental health prevalence surveys for adults and children and young people

Interactive reports for common mental disorders released in the Adult Psychiatric Morbidity Survey and the Mental Health of Children and Young People in England Survey publications.

 

These interactive reports present time-series data for common mental disorders released in the Adult Psychiatric Morbidity Survey and the Mental Health of Children and Young People in England Survey publications. In contrast to the Mental Health Service Dataset, these statistics are based on a representative sample of the residential population in England. People with a mental health problem may not be referred for treatment within secondary mental health services for a variety of reasons. As these statistics do not rely on administrative data generated by these services, they offer our best estimates of the proportion of the population who may have certain mental health problems.  

Adult Psychiatric Morbidity Survey

The Adult Psychiatric Morbidity Survey (APMS) series provides data on the prevalence of both treated and untreated psychiatric disorder in the English adult population (aged 16 and over). This survey is the fourth in a series and was conducted by NatCen Social Research, in collaboration with the University of Leicester, for NHS Digital.

This interactive report shows the prevalence of people with common mental disorders by mental disorder, gender and age range. 

Surveys have been carried out in 1993, 2000, 2007 and 2014 using comparable methods so trends can be examined. The charts display data for all 4 surveys and the table compares the latest 2014 data with the previous 2007 data.

The default view displays all adults that were 16 to 64 years of age at the time of the survey. To select a different age range select the appropriate button from the ‘Select an age band‘ section at the top of the page.

Accessibility of this tool

This tool is in Microsoft PowerBI which does not fully support all accessibility needs.  If you need further assistance, please contact us for help.

Mental Health of Children and Young People in England Survey

The Mental Health of Children and Young People in England Survey (MHCYP) series provides data on the prevalence of different types of specific mental disorders. Three years of comparable data is available for 5 to 15 year olds living in England. This survey was carried out by the National Centre for Social Research, the Office for National Statistics and Youthinmind, for NHS Digital.

This interactive report shows the prevalence of children and young people with specific mental disorders by disorder, gender and age range. 

Surveys have been carried out in 1999, 2004, and 2017 using comparable methods so trends can be examined. The charts display data for all 3 surveys and the table compares the latest 2017 data with the previous 2004 data.

The default view displays all children and young people that were 5 to 15 years of age at the time of the survey. To select a different age range select the appropriate button from the ‘Select an age band‘ section at the top of the page. 

Accessibility of this tool

This tool is in Microsoft PowerBI which does not fully support all accessibility needs.  If you need further assistance, please contact us for help.

How to use this tool

To filter results, please refer to the specific instructions accompanying each visualisation.

To clear filtered results, hover your mouse underneath any filtered option heading to enable the ‘Clear selections’ eraser icon. Select this icon to clear previous selections and filtered results.

Hover your mouse over a visual to see results displayed in the tooltip.

What you can find out

The estimated prevalence of a range of types of mental disorders in the population.

Observe potential trends and different patterns of change over time in different age groups and gender.

Identify and examine potential trends in estimated prevalence of mental disorders through comparison with previous surveys in the series.

What the report can't tell you

As with all surveys, it should be acknowledged that prevalence rates are based on a sample of the population and as such are only estimates. If everyone in the population had been assessed the rate found may be higher or lower than the survey estimate. 95% Confidence Intervals (CIs) are given for key estimates in the reports available at the links below. For low prevalence disorders, relatively few positive cases were identified. Particular attention should be given to uncertainty around these estimates and to subgroup analysis based on these small samples. Please refer to the reports available in the More information section below to understand if the differences between estimates presented here are statistically significant. All other apparent differences should not be used to infer differences in the total population.

The APMS and MHCYP use different sampling methods, questionnaires and data collection methods. The data from each of these reports should therefore be treated independently as they are not directly comparable.

For the purpose of determining the presence of mental disorders the mental health assessments used are not as reliable as a clinical interview.

Trends may need to be treated with some caution as the base sizes for some age by gender combinations are small.

Prevalence broken down by other demographic characteristics covered by the APMS and MHCYP such as ethnicity, household type, employment and benefit status, region and smoking status.

Learn more about the publications

Notes and data sources

Statistics were produced from the APMS and MHCYP series publications. The data in these reports are based on surveys that have been conducted from a representative sample of adults and children and young people. People with a mental health problem may not be referred for treatment within secondary mental health services for a variety of reasons. The use of validated mental disorder screens and assessments within these surveys allows for identification of people with sub-threshold symptoms and those with an undiagnosed disorder.

An advantage surveys like APMS and MHCYP have over routinely collected health data is that for each participant a large amount of data on a range of topics is collected and relationships can be examined. In particular, the questionnaire covers detailed and current information about people’s social and economic circumstances, information which does not tend to be collected in a consistent or comprehensive way in administrative data sets.

Full details of the strengths and limitations of these surveys can be found in the methods reports within each publication.

To help interpret these interactive reports and for further information about the data presented in the reports, please refer to the APMS and MHCYP publication pages.

Suppression

The data within these interactive reports are not suppressed.

Last edited: 13 May 2020 8:42 am