Skip to main content

Current Chapter

Current chapter – LTS003


Carer support provided during the year, broken down by the age of the carer, Primary Support Reason of the client (cared-for) and the type of support provided.

Period 01/04/2021 – 31/03/202 (all tables).


General description and business case

As defined in the ASC Data Dictionary, clients may have support provided by an unpaid carer. This includes support from family, friends and neighbours where the client has identified “there is someone who helps me”. Paid care workers funded by direct payments, provided as part of a commissioned service or in a residential and nursing care setting are not in the scope of the SALT collection and so should not be counted as ‘carers’. Similarly, those in a prison setting should also not be counted as having a carer.

Carers make a vital contribution to promoting the wellbeing and independence of the people they care for and supporting carers effectively helps them to have a life of their own alongside caring. Carers also prevent those they care for from requiring more intensive social care support, which would place additional pressure on local authority budgets. Carers may themselves have social care needs that impact on their caring role.

The information collected here will give a view of the support being provided for carers nationally and when benchmarked the data will allow differences between local authorities to be examined. Local authorities will be able to combine this data with results from the Carers Survey to allow an examination of how different carer circumstances and modes of support influence outcomes for those carers. The idea is that best practice can emerge and be shared, resulting in wider improvements.

This measure includes both support for new carers and support for those already known to the council. Carers should be included if they were receiving ongoing support during the year, even if no review of those arrangements took place. Carers assessed during the year but provided no support should also be included. Carers who are assessed or reviewed but receiving no substantial support will in most cases receive some form of information & advice or be signposted to another organisation. A new table has been introduced to capture support provided only to new carers, replacing the previous voluntary tables (Table 1b).


Who to include/exclude?

For support to be included in LTS003 the following criteria must apply:

  • both long AND short term support to carers should be included, but the provision of support has to occur within the year (1st April – 31st March)
  • assessments / reviews which have occurred prior to year-end but with services due to begin in the following year are excluded
  • support provided this year following assessment / review last year is included
  • the carer must be caring for an adult over the age of 18, though they themselves may be younger
  • support should be primarily for the benefit of the carer in their caring role, although this may result in actual service provision to the cared-for person (for example. respite care)

The intention is to count the numbers of carers supported, which in some cases involves support delivered to the cared-for person (e.g. respite) rather than the carer.


Identifying carers

The measure also includes carers who may not have the Primary Support Reason of ‘Social Support – Support for Carer’. For example, a husband who cares for his wife may also receive support for his own social care needs. The local authority decides that the support received for social care needs is the primary support reason, and records this as such.

Although his PSR is not ‘Social Support – Support for Carer’, he continues to receive support as a carer, and so should be included in this measure. One way to ensure all carers are identified may be to flag individuals as having a ‘Carer Role’. This will allow easy cross referencing of carers’ services and social care services for the same individual.

Carers without a linked service user (i.e. where details of the cared-for person are not recorded on the local authority database) should be included.

Whether someone is included in the LTS003 measure as a carer has no bearing on whether they might also appear in one of the other SALT measures for their own social care needs (STS or LTS measures). See the section on 'Carers who are also service users' below for more detail on this.


Carer assessments and reviews

LTS003 does distinguish whether support for carers is provided through an ‘assessment’ or ‘review' although this is not a requirement for the provision of services. Local authorities will have different systems in place for determining the needs of carers and allocating support. For example, ‘universal services’, given without any formal assessment of need, are included in this measure. Nevertheless, it is expected that substantial support to carers (e.g. a personal budget or respite provision) would follow either a review of existing support arrangements or a new assessment for those contacting the council for the first time.

Although local arrangements for assessment of carer needs differ, all should include direct contact with the carer. Carers under the age of 18 where the cared-for person is over 18 at the time of request / review should be included.

Matters relating to adult safeguarding procedures are NOT dealt with here (please see the Safeguarding Adults Return (SAC) collection for details of how these are collected).


Determining whether support is for the client or carer

The test of whether support is for a carer should be based on whether the support is only needed because the carer has a role in supporting the client, e.g. if the client receives a ‘sitting service’, to give the carer some free time, that support is entirely due to the carer’s need for a break, and would not otherwise be provided to the client.

Local authorities should only include requests for support here that are related to providing support to the carer in their caring role, although this may result in actual service provision to the cared-for person. People requesting support with their own social care needs (i.e. potential service users) may also be acting as carers – but such requests are NOT part of this measure. Local authorities therefore need to identify whether a particular request is for social care needs or carer support needs. Support for carers may be recorded on the service user’s social care record rather than that of the carer. Councils will therefore need to ensure that carer’s services (as defined by SALT) are identifiable on their client databases, regardless of whose record they are recorded against.

If multiple instances of support (e.g. at different times of the year) are made in relation to the same carer, the carer is only counted once. There is a hierarchy similar to that used in other STS and LTS measures whereby the most significant type of support provided is counted, when reading the table from left to right. Provision of carer services which are delivered to the cared-for person are recorded in addition to any support provided directly to the carer (the guidance for Table 1a below provides more details).


Carers who are also service users

Some carers also have social care needs themselves and are in receipt of long or short term support. Measure LTS003 includes carers who have received carer support and also received long or short term support as a client in their own right. Their inclusion as a carer in LTS003 has no bearing on their new client status for any other SALT measure.

There should be no double counting of carer and client services across tables in the SALT return – carers who are also service users may appear in LTS003 as well as LTS001a (possibly LTS001b and c also) and/or STS002a or b in the same year, but this must relate to different packages of support provided for different purposes – for example respite care delivered to a client to give the carer a break is primarily for the benefit of the carer and is therefore counted in LTS003 but not LTS001 or LTS002. Any ST-Max given to the person for social care needs must not be counted in LTS003.

The only exception to this is where direct payments for the carer are added to the client’s personal budget (for efficiency). The cash personal budget would already be counted in LTS001 (a, b or c) for the client and would be counted again (as a carer direct payment) in LTS003. This example still meets the aim stated above that there should be no double- counting, as the money paid to the client for carer support is for different purposes (and should be separately identified in the support plan).


Detailed guidance for data tables

Table 1a

Age band of carer

As noted above, young carers may be supporting an adult or older person and this table will capture carers aged under 18 as in previous years. The age band of carers aged 18-25 continues. This reflects the need to provide more insights into carers who have legally become adults but whose support may still be provided jointly or be in transition from children to adult social care teams as part of transition arrangements and local authority duties to support certain young people up to the age of 25. The age bands also include carers aged over 85 in order to allow analysis of where a carer may themselves be quite frail.

Support direct to the carer versus support involved the cared for person

For each carer who has received support, use the table below, working from top to bottom, to determine which service to report. The measure is a count of people not a count of services, so there is a hierarchy of support to follow in a similar way to other SALT measures.

However, it is possible that the carer receives no services directly, but a service is given to the service user instead (e.g. in order to give the carer a break). Service provision to the service user (for the carer’s benefit) will be counted in addition to any support given to the carer directly. So where support is delivered to both the carer AND the cared-for person (for the carers’ benefit) the service to the carer would be captured in the main section of the table according to the hierarchy from left to right, with the additional support received by the cared- for person also being recorded in the column “Support Involving Cared-For Person”.

If a carer only has respite (or another service delivered to the cared-for person) then you should consider whether to include this in the ‘No Direct Support provided to carer’ column of the table, as well as in the columns headed ‘Respite or Other Forms of Carer Support delivered to the cared-for person’. Guidance is given below. 


How to count respite care and other forms of support delivered to the cared-for person

Respite support, enabling the carer to have a break from their caring role, is support provided to the service user/cared-for person although it primarily benefits the carer. Such support is included in SALT but counted differently depending on how it is delivered.

  • If respite support is paid for through a direct payment, then the support is treated as direct support to the carer (through the provision of the direct payment) and not as support involving the cared-for person
  • If respite support is arranged by the council for the carer through a managed personal budget or outside of a personal budget/direct payment, then it is treated as support involving the cared-for person and not as direct support to the carer

Any funds added to the service user’s personal budget for carer support and paid to the service user should be counted in LTS003 in the ‘Direct payment only’ or ‘Part direct payment’ categories and NOT in the ‘Respite or Other Forms of Carer Support delivered to the cared-for person’. Although provided to the client, if the money is clearly identified up- front as being for carer support and available to the carer to use in ways and at times of their choosing, it can be included in LTS003. This will ensure that carers’ direct payments and personal budgets are fully captured, even though for simplicity councils may choose to add this money to a client’s existing allocation of funds.


Hierarchy of support given

Direct payment only

This should be chosen where support is provided to the carer entirely through the provision of a cash payment or cash personal budget. As mentioned above, carer payments may be combined with a cash personal budget paid to the cared-for person. The carer must nevertheless have control of any funds intended for carer support. It does not matter what the carer spends the money on – respite services purchased through a direct payment would be counted here (but not as support involving the cared-for person).

Part direct payment

Similar to the direct payment only but where only some of the support comes through the provision of a cash payment or cash personal budget. An example could be where a one-off payment is given to help the carer purchase some equipment and, a training course was paid for by the council to help them learn new skills and cope better with their caring role. Again, carers purchasing respite services through a direct payment while other commissioned services were also supplied to the carer would be counted here (but not as support involving the cared- for person). Universal services, signposting to other organisations and information & advice are not included in the scope of a personal budget and should not be considered here.

CASSR managed personal budget

Applies when the local authority commissions support with a cost and this is done via a self-directed support route with an up-front allocation of funds, but where the carer chooses not to receive any of that support in the form of a cash payment themselves. Respite services arranged through a managed personal budget would not be included here but should be counted as support involving the cared-for person.


CASSR commissioned support only

Applies when the local authority commissions support with a cost and provides this outside of a personal budget (i.e. there is no self-directed support and allocation of funds and no choice for the carer in how to spend those funds). Respite services delivered by the local authority should not be counted here but as support involving the cared-for person.

Information, advice and other universal services/signposting

Applies if no costed support is given following screening / assessment but some form of advice or information (in the form of leaflets, verbal discussion with the carer) or other provision is made. This includes where specific recommendations are made or appointments set up with other organisations (e.g. in the voluntary sector).

No direct support provided to carer

If there is no support required or available to offer direct to the carer then use this category. Also include cases here where although nothing was delivered to the carer, the cared-for person received services for the benefit of the carer (such as respite care arranged by the local authority not through a direct payment).o Direct Support’ also allows recognition of the fact that an assessment or review has taken place where those requests for support fell outside eligibility criteria for carer services.


Support involving cared-for person

Support to the cared-for person is reported as follows

Respite or other forms of carer support delivered to the cared for person

This category is a subset of the numbers captured in the main (left side) section of the table. If any support is arranged by the local authority for the cared-for person for the benefit of the carer, it must be included here. If all carers support is delivered to the cared-for in this way, it is still necessary to record ‘No Direct Support Provided to Carer’ in the main section of the table, in order that an accurate count of carers is made. The most common example is respite care arranged by the local authority which might involve the client being placed in a residential setting in order to give the carer a break from their caring responsibilities. Note that direct payments made to the client’s account for carer support (including respite) are NOT included here - they should be counted in the direct payment categories, above.

Support provided direct to carer OTHER THAN ‘Information, advice and other universal services / signposting’

This category is a subset of the numbers captured in the main section of the table. If any support is delivered to the client for the benefit of the carer, it can be included here. If all carer support is delivered to the client, it is still necessary to record ‘No Direct Support Provided to Carer’ in the main section of the table, in order that an accurate count of carers is made.

It should be noted that the subdivision refers to support provided to the carer. This column should therefore be utilised to record data on the number of instances of support provided direct to the cared-for person where there is ALSO support provided direct to the carer other than ‘Information, advice and other universal services / signposting’.

The most common example of support delivered direct to the cared- for person is the cared-for person being provided with a short term placement in order to give the carer a break from their caring responsibilities. Note that direct payments made to the client’s account for carer support are NOT included here - they should already have been counted in the direct payment categories, above.

ONLY ‘Information, advice and other universal services / signposting’ OR no direct support provided to carer

This category is also a subset of the numbers captured in the main section of the table. If any support is delivered to the client for the benefit of the carer, it can be included here. If all carers support is delivered to the client, it is still necessary to record ‘No Direct Support Provided to Carer’ in the main section of the table, in order that an accurate count of carers is made.

It should be noted that the subdivision refers to support provided to the carer. This column should therefore be utilised to record data on the number of instances of support provided direct to the cared-for person where there is ALSO support provided direct to the carer either of solely ‘Information, advice and other universal services / signposting’ OR where no direct support was provided to the carer.

The most common example of support provided direct to the cared- for person might involve the cared-for person being provided with a short term placement in order to give the carer a break from their caring responsibilities.


Table 1b

Table 1b is identical to Table 1a except that only new carers should be included. The definition of a new carer is:

 

A carer is ‘new’ for the purposes of SALT in 2021-22 if they were not counted in LTS003 in 2020-21.

Some examples of new carers (and to be included in Table 1b) are:

  • A carer who has never approached the council for support.
  • A carer who previously approached the council for support but was last assessed/reviewed and/or last received support prior to 1st April 2020.

Some examples of where carers are NOT new (and shouldn’t be included in Table 1b) are:

  • A carer who now supports a different or additional person, but they received support as a carer and counted in LTS003 during this or the previous reporting year.
  • A carer who received one off support in the previous reporting year and received one off support again this year.
  • A carer who was assessed in the previous reporting year but received no support.

Table 2

Table 2 counts cared-for people, broken down by delivery mechanism and primary support reason, whereas Table 1 is counting carers, broken down by delivery mechanism and age band.

Please also refer to the Primary Support Reason in the Data Dictionary


Table 3

Assessed jointly, separately, or not assessed?

To be counted in the ‘Jointly with the cared-for person’ or ‘Separately from the cared-for person’ rows, direct contact is required with the carer and this must involve an assessment of need that determines the support provision made. This may include written as well as verbal / face to face contact (e.g. forms sent through the post or online to conduct a self- assessment and returned to the local authority).

If the carer is assessed or reviewed during the year, the cared-for person (if identified) may also have been involved in that assessment – this is termed a ‘joint assessment’. The level of client involvement will vary, case by case and between councils. Nevertheless, if the cared-for person is known, linked to the carer on the client database and was involved in a significant way in the assessment / review of the carer, this should be included under the ‘Jointly with the cared-for person’ row. If there was no significant involvement (e.g. where the carer specifically requests a separate assessment) then it should be counted under the ‘Separately from the cared-for person’ row. In all cases what is being referred to by ‘assessment’ is an assessment of the carers needs (not those of the cared-for person).

Sometimes support (e.g. ‘universal services’) will be offered that doesn’t require a full assessment of carer needs. These cases may go through a screening process (perhaps done by a contact centre) and support may be given without direct contact with the carer or without anything more than a short phone call. These should be counted in the ‘No review or assessment during the year’ row.

Not all carers in receipt of support services during the year will be reviewed – these carers should still be included (in the ‘No review or assessment during the year’ row) even though no review takes place.

If a carer supports more than one person they should still be counted only once. If they have more than one carer assessment during the year, use the most recent assessment to determine whether they were assessed separately or jointly.

Counting the total number of carers

By adding up all the cells in Table 1, under the columns ‘Support Direct to Carer’ and ‘No direct support provided to carer’ but NOT the ‘Respite or Other Forms of Carer Support delivered to the cared-for person’ column, this should equal the total number of carers.

Last edited: 16 May 2022 8:31 am