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Part of Annual inclusion report 2021-22

Our pay gaps

We've analysed our pay gaps in 3 categories:

  • gender
  • ethnicity
  • disability

The pay gaps analysis is presented for these 3 categories, as there are sufficient declarations to provide robust pay gap analysis of these categories.

Other diversity categories, such as LGB+, with smaller numbers of declarations have not been presented due to disclosure controls and the potentially misleading impact of small numbers on headline figures.


Gender pay gap

Trends 

Analysis of the data shows: 

  • our mean gender pay gap, currently 9.4%, has decreased by 7 percentage points since 2017
  • the median pay gap, currently 11.4%, after remaining static for a couple of years has decreased 2 percentage points in the last year 

Impact 

The gender pay gap continues to be impacted by levels of basic pay and the differences in senior representation, followed by allocation of Recruitment Retention Premium (RRP) and distribution of on call pay. 

There may be small variations in the data set of the report for 2021 compared to those from previous years. If the differences in the data were removed, the same conclusions would be made from the analysis.

9.4% mean pay gap

For every £1 that the average man earned, the average woman earned £0.91

11.4% median pay gap

For every £1 that the median man earned, the median woman earned £0.89

In consultation with our LGBTQ+ staff network we have agreed that where binary male/female categories are referenced this represents sex (i.e., assigned at birth)  as opposed to a gender identity (e.g. cis gender, non-binary, gender fluid etc).  We are working towards improving how we represent gender identities within our inclusion data and hope to share further developments within future annual reports.


Ethnicity pay gap

Trends 

Analysis of the data shows: 

  • our mean ethnicity pay gap is 7.8%, showing a continued decrease since 2017
  • the median pay gap is 8.7%, having risen since 2017, but has increased less than 1 percentage point this year 

Impact 

The ethnicity pay gap is impacted by levels of basic pay and the differences in senior representation, followed by allocation of RRP and distribution of on call pay. The higher proportion of black, Asian and minority ethnic staff being based in London is reflected in the positive effect London weighting allowance has on the overall pay gap.

There may be small variations in the data set of the report for 2021, compared to those from previous years. If the differences in the data were removed, the same conclusions would be made from the analysis. 

7.8% mean pay gap

For every £1 that the average white colleague earned, the average black, Asian and minority ethnic colleague earned £0.92

8.7% median pay gap

For every £1 that the median white colleague earned, the median black, Asian and minority ethnic colleague earned £0.91


Disability pay gap

Trends 

Analysis of the data shows: 

  • our mean disability pay gap has increased more than a percentage point in the last year
  • the median pay gap has also increased more than a percentage point in the last year 

Impact 

The disability pay gap is impacted by basic pay. Notably the proportion of staff declaring a disability and in receipt of additional pay such as RRP and London weighting allowance and on call pay is much lower than that for non-disabled colleagues, women and black, Asian and minority ethnicities.

It should also be noted that non-disclosure rates are higher within the more senior pay bands. Lower disclosure rates and lower representation within more senior pay bands lead to lower average basic pay. 

There may be small variations in the data set of the report for 2021 compared to those from previous years. If the differences in the data were removed, the same conclusions would be made from the analysis.

9.3% mean pay gap

For every £1 that the average person with no stated disability earned, the average disabled person earned £0.91

6.9% median pay gap

For every £1 that the median person with no stated disability earned, the average disabled person earned £0.93


Challenging questions for our action plan

To better understand our pay gaps and to help inform our action plans, we've posed ourselves a series of challenging questions.


Do people get ‘stuck’ at certain levels within the organisation?

The analysis indicates that disabled colleagues stay at the top of their pay band significantly longer than colleagues who declare they do not have a disability.

Tenure at the top of the band for black, Asian and minority ethnic colleagues shows a different pattern to that of white colleagues. More black, Asian and minority ethnic colleagues spend up to 3 years at the top of the band and significantly fewer spending 4 or more years (31% compared with 48%).

A slightly higher proportion of women than men spend one year at the top of their band, and a slightly higher proportion of men spend four years or more at the top of the band.

Is there an imbalance in who gets promoted?

Promotion and acting up rates for disabled and black, Asian and minority ethnic colleagues are lower, suggesting that there may be barriers to career progression. Employees who have been promoted while acting up are included in the overall promoted figures.

Ethnicity

Promotion and acting up rates are comparable with the overall organisational representation rate, however, below the published target rate of 19%.

Disability

Overall declaration rates for disability are low, however the data indicates that disabled colleagues are underrepresented by half within acting up roles. A similar pattern is evident in relation to promotions.

There is higher representation of women in acting up roles, but this is not being translated into permanent promotions. Women are underrepresented by approximately half when compared to men and in comparison, to the organisation representation rate for women.

Are some groups more likely to be recruited to lower paid roles?

There's been a slight increase in the proportion of disabled staff in the lower pay bands, however overall representation is broadly proportionate across all bands. Attraction and selection of disabled candidates is low, and it is notable that there have not been any appointments to senior grades. It should be noted that declaration rates are particularly low for disability, particularly during recruitment.

Black, Asian and minority ethnic colleagues are disproportionately underrepresented within the lowest pay bands. However, percentage success rates in recruitment at middle and senior management level have been mostly maintained or proportionately slightly increased from the previous year. There's an overall 12.1% of recruitment success rate when averaged across all bands, which is lower than the target rate. 

There were relatively equal numbers of men and women appointed to junior grades.


Do some aspects of pay (bonus/starting salary/additional payments) differ?

The biggest cause of the mean pay gap was the basic pay factor, largely due to a small number of colleagues declaring a disability occupying the more senior pay grades in comparison to those with no declared disability. The London weighting allowance was the only factor found to reduce the pay gap apart from RRP in 2021. The basic pay factor contributes to 9.1% of the 9.3% pay gap.

There's a higher proportion of black, Asian and minority ethnic colleagues based in London, where they receive a high-cost area supplement which has a positive effect on the pay gap. The basic pay factor is 8.3% and the impact of the London weighting allowance was to reduce the mean ethnicity pay gap by 1.1 percentage points and this impact has remained consistent with previous years. The mean ethnicity pay gap is 7.8%.

Far more men than women are in roles that receive RRP and on call premiums which increases the pay gap. RRP contributes 1.2% to the mean gender pay gap while on call contributes to 0.6%. This is consistent with previous years.

Basic pay factor is the biggest contributor to the pay gap, and this has decreased by 7 percentage points since 2017, from contributing 15.2% to a 16.6% mean pay gap in 2017 to 8% of a 9.4% mean pay gap in 2021.

Do different groups leave at different rates?

Black, Asian and minority ethnic colleagues left NHS Digital at higher comparable rates to white colleagues in all band ranges apart from senior management. Disabled colleagues left at a comparable rate to non-disabled colleagues respectively.


Last edited: 23 February 2022 1:22 pm