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National Statistics

Infant Feeding Survey - 2010, Early results [NS]

05:29 August 25, 2016 - 09:30 June 21, 2011
Publication date: June 21, 2011
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Summary

The 2010 Infant Feeding Survey is the eighth in a series of national surveys. These surveys have been conducted every five years since 1975, on behalf of the four Health Departments in the United Kingdom. This latest survey has been commissioned by the NHS Information Centre for Health and Social Care (NHS IC) and is being conducted by IFF Research.

The main aim of the survey is to provide estimates of the incidence, prevalence and duration of breastfeeding and other feeding practices adopted by mothers from the birth of their baby up to around ten months. The survey also collects information about the smoking and drinking behaviour of mothers before, during and after pregnancy.

The survey consists of a longitudinal design (similar to previous surveys in this series) with data being collected in three stages. The first stage is collected when the babies are approximately 6-10 weeks old, the second when they are 4-6 months old and the third when they are 8-10 months old. The results presented in this Early Results publication are based on Stage 1 of the survey only and cover two key topics; the initial incidence of breastfeeding and smoking during pregnancy. The final stage of the survey is currently underway and a full report is expected to be published by the NHS IC in Summer 2012.

Key facts

Initial incidence of breastfeeding

Key findings from the report show that the initial incidence of breastfeeding in 2010 for the UK and by country was:

  • 81 per cent in the UK (an increase from 76 per cent in 2005)
  • 83 per cent in England (an increase from 78 per cent in 2005)
  • 71 per cent in Wales (an increase from 67 per cent in 2005)
  • 74 per cent in Scotland (an increase from 70 per cent in 2005)
  • 64 per cent in Northern Ireland (no statistically significant change from 63 per cent reported in 2005)

Smoking in pregnancy

The percentage of mothers that smoked before or during their pregnancy decreased between 2005 and 2010 in the UK and for each country. The findings show that this was:

  • 26 per cent of mothers in the UK, of which 54 per cent gave up at some point before the birth (the corresponding figures were 33 per cent and 48 per cent in 2005).
  • 26 per cent of mothers in England, of which 55 per cent gave up at some point before the birth (the corresponding figures were 32 per cent and 49 per cent in 2005).
  • 33 per cent of mothers in Wales, of which 50 per cent gave up at some point before the birth (the corresponding figures were 37 per cent and 41 per cent in 2005).
  • 27 per cent of mothers in Scotland, of which 52 per cent gave up at some point before the birth (the corresponding figures were 35 per cent and 44 per cent in 2005).
  • 28 per cent of mothers in the Northern Ireland, of which 47 per cent gave up at some point before the birth (the corresponding figures were 32 per cent and 43 per cent in 2005).

The number of mothers that had smoked throughout their pregnancy had declined between 2005 and 2010 in the UK and in each country. The findings show that this was:

  • 12 per cent of mothers in the UK (compared to 17 per cent in 2005).
  • 12 per cent of mothers in England (compared to 17 per cent in 2005).
  • 16 per cent of mothers in Wales (compared to 22 per cent in 2005).
  • 13 per cent of mothers in Scotland (compared to 20 per cent in 2005).
  • 15 per cent of mothers in Northern Ireland (compared to 18 per cent in 2005).

Resources

Coverage

Date Range: January 01, 2005 to December 31, 2010
Geographical coverage:
UK
Geographical granularity:
Country

Related links

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